Excavating in preperation for Ty-Mawr’s sublime floor system

In November Hawkland travelled over to Killgetty in Wales to work on the restoration of a large stone built farm house.


Our work was a small part of this large project that our client have taken on. Just over a year ago they brought this run down farm and have been working on it ever since. The main farm house is a beautiful stone building acting as the canvas to a collage of various eras and adaptations. The most unfortunate of which is instantly apparent in the above photo. The whole building, the walls around it and some of the attached out buildings has, at some point in it’s not so distant past, been cement rendered.

This over time has allowed the development of damp and mould growth within the building. The walls are solid stone with lime mortar and built directly onto the ground which allows for the movement of moisture up through the walls. This is okay when the walls are allowed to ‘breathe’ through the use of vapour permeable materials. However with the addition of the cement outside and gypsum inside these materials trap the moisture in the walls causing damp issues, giving rise to mold growth and the potential of reduced internal air quality.


The owners have already started to take off the cement from the outside and the gypsum plaster on the inside, allowing the walls to start drying out, although this can take a long time due to the thickness of the walls.

The focus for us and our involvement with this restoration was to help lower the entire ground floor level by 150mm / 200mm. This is to create space for the installation of Ty-Mawr’s sublime insulated limecrete floor system. 

The ground substrate varied widely in each room. We went from digging through bed rock in the first room, lifting and removing a suspended timber floor, a solid concrete floor in the kitchen and layers of limecrete, concrete and various other additions in living room.

 

With two of us on site and working for six days we removed over 13m2 of soil and rubble and levelled the floors out ready for the foam glass gravel to be poured in up to 120mm deep and compacted down to 100mm. A large scale renovation, not for the faint hearted but in the end this will be a lovely farm house.

 

 

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